the  JOY

OF THE LORD IS

                        our STRENGTH

 nehemiah 8:10 NKJV

 cancer prevention

Prostate Cancer Blog

Prostate cancer in the second most common cancer in men worldwide and the single most common cancer in men in the United States. The approach to prevent this disease has changed over the years. Read our blog and listen to the Believers Medicine Podcast to find out more.

Prostate Cancer Wrap Up and Prayer

Prostate Cancer Wrap Up and Prayer

Prostate cancer in the second most common cancer in men worldwide and the single most common cancer in men in the United States. Worldwide over 1000 men are expected to die from prostate cancer every day. In the United States men have a 12-13% lifetime risk of developing prostate cancer. Prostate cancer presents a unique risk to men with no easy answers on how to find this disease at an early stage. Let’s review what we learned about prostate cancer so far. Afterwards, I would like to pray for you.

Fighting Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Fighting Metastatic Prostate Cancer

When prostate cancer has spread outside the prostate gland to affect the lymph nodes of other parts of the body, this is called metastatic prostate cancer. If you have been told that you have this disease, do not be discouraged. This is not a death sentence. There are many men that live a healthy and fulfilling life with this disease. At times, a doctor may even wait to begin treatment for metastatic prostate cancer if there are no symptoms. When treatment is necessary, there are several things one can expect.

Prostate Cancer Treatment

Prostate Cancer Treatment

There are many types of treatments for prostate cancer. Along with other medications, some men are treated with surgery or radiation. At other times, prostate cancer does not need to be treated. It can be “watched,” or monitored from year to year. In our previous blog and podcast, we discussed how the Gleason score can help guide a treatment course for prostate cancer. In addition to the Gleason score, there are other factors, such as the PSA level and tumor stage, that will be help plan a path to treat prostate cancer. Let’s find out how the Gleason score, PSA level, and tumor stage are used to help formulate a plan to treat prostate cancer.

Gleason Score

Gleason Score

There are many types of treatments for prostate cancer. Along with other medications, some men are treated with surgery or radiation. At other times, prostate cancer does not need to be treated. It can be “watched,” or monitored from year to year. The decision for treatment with surgery, radiation or watchful waiting depends on many factors. One is these factors is called a Gleason score. After undergoing a prostate biopsy, a doctor that specializes in looking at tissues on microscope, also known as a pathologist, will give a score to grade the cancer cell from not aggressive to aggressive. This is called a Gleason score. Let’s find out more about the Gleason score and how this number can be used to guide the treatment of prostate cancer.

Before & After My Prostate Biopsy

Before & After My Prostate Biopsy

The choice to undergo a biopsy of the prostate is an important decision. After a PSA blood test, and likely an MRI of the prostate gland, are performed, you and your doctor may come to the decision that a biopsy of the prostate gland is best for you. With this biopsy, several small samples of tissues are taken from the prostate gland. In way, the doctor will get better idea of the presence or absence of prostate cancer or the aggressiveness of these cells if found. Let find out more about you can expect before and after your prostate biopsy.

When Should I Get a Biopsy of My Prostate?

When Should I Get a Biopsy of My Prostate?

The decision to get a biopsy of your prostate is a big one. There can be anxiety while awaiting results. Once results are obtained, a cancer diagnosis can carry a heavy weight. These drawbacks are especially concerning when we consider a large number of prostate cancers are slow growing and will not cause death. Notwithstanding, there are some prostate cancers that are aggressive and deadly. Therefore, a prostate biopsy becomes an important means to identify and separate slow growing cancers for aggressive ones. Lest find out more about when you should consider getting a biopsy of your prostate.

MRI of the Prostate Before the Biopsy?

MRI of the Prostate Before the Biopsy?

You have decided to get a PSA blood test and it is higher than expected. The test is repeated, and remains elevated. When you look at you PSA blood test year over year, it has increased with time. You have a discuss with your primary care doctor and it is their recommendation that you consider a biopsy. A referral is placed to a urologist. Yet, before seeing the urologist you ask yourself: “should I consider an MRI of my prostate before undergoing a biopsy?” The answer in most case is “yes.” Let’s find out why.

When Should I Get a PSA?

Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide and in the United States. About 1,600,000 men worldwide, and 165,00 men in the United States, are affected by prostate cancer each year. Typically, a blood called a PSA, or Prostate Specific Antigen, is used to screen for prostate cancer. The chances of being affected by prostate cancer increases as men get older. Therefore, it is important to know the right time to be screened for prostate cancer. With this in mind, the timing of prostate cancer screening depends of whether a man is considered an average or high risk for this disease. Let’s find out more about the when one should be screened for prostate cancer.

Prostate Specific Antigen

Prostate Specific Antigen

When you go to your doctor for a yearly visit, you may be offered a blood test to search for prostate cancer. This blood test is called a Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA). Nowadays, some professional societies recommend against using digital rectal exam to search for prostate for cancer. We have found the blood test is more helpful than using our finger to find cancer in average risk men, but the blood test is not perfect either. When receiving your test results, it is not enough to know if you test was “positive” or “negative.” You need to know your number. There are 3 different cut offs you should remember when looking at your PSA results.

Prostate Cancer Tests

Prostate Cancer Tests

There are a number of ways to detect prostate cancer. Traditionally, a doctor would attempt to feel the prostate gland with their finger. This is called a digital rectal exam, or a DRE. With time, it become apparent that this was not a perfect test for a number of reasons. Presently, we screen for prostate cancer with a blood test called a Prostate Specific Antigen, or a PSA. This test also has its limitations. Let’s find out more about how to look for prostate cancer with these two methods.

Prostate Cancer Symptoms

Prostate Cancer Symptoms

Before we begin our discussion on the symptoms of prostate cancer, it is important to realize that it is our goal to detect prostate cancer before symptoms develop. More prostate cancers are found when there are not symptoms at all. Instead, a high Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) may be found on blood testing or a hard prostate gland may be found on a rectal exam. When symptoms of prostate cancer come about, this can mean that the cancer has spread beyond the prostate. At other times, the symptoms of prostate cancer can be confused with other conditions of the bladder and prostate. Let’s find out more about the symptoms of prostate cancer and what we can do to catch this disease early.

Prostate Cancer Risk Factors

Prostate Cancer Risk Factors

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer amongst men in the United States, and the second most common cancer in men worldwide. There are some well-established risk factors for prostate cancer. As with many cancers, there are some risks, such as our age, that are not under our control. While other risk, such as diet, are influenced by our decisions and can help lower the risk of cancer. When we look at the risk for prostate cancer; age, family history and ethnicity are major risk factors for this disease. Let’s find out more about prostate cancer and some of the things we can do decrease the chances of being affected by this disease.

Prostate Cancer Facts

Prostate Cancer Facts

Prostate cancer in the second most common cancer in men worldwide and the single most common cancer in men in the United States. More specifically, there are over 3 million men who are living with prostate cancer in the United States. Worldwide over 1000 men are expected to die from prostate cancer every day. In the United States, about nearly 100 men are expected to die from prostate cancer each day. In the United States men have a 12-13% lifetime risk of developing prostate cancer.

MY STRENGTH IS

MADE PERFECT

                     IN weakness

LUKE 8:50 NKJV

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